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We ensure that children who struggle in learning to read and write gain the skills for a literate and productive future.

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Contact your elected officials in Washington
Senate websites
http://www.senate.gov
House of Representatives websites
http://www.house.gov

In addition, any citizen can make a call to the U.S. Capitol operator at 202-224-3121 and be transferred to the office of your senators or U.S. representative.


 


Resources



Advocacy GuideAdvocacy How-To Guide (PDF)
 

Reading Recovery Works! (PDF)

What Works Clearinghouse analysis


Reading Recovery and Common Core State Standards
Reading Recovery can play a vital role in ensuring that students are able to meet the goals of the Common Core State Standards. Free resources include a 20-minute webcast, an article from The Journal of Reading Recovery, and a report from RRCNA.
 

 

 

altRRCNA is the only association advocating exclusively for Reading Recovery and early literacy intervention.

 

Hot Topics

Little movement seen in renewing federal education laws 
Skepticism remains high that federal education laws, already outdated, might not get reauthorized by the end of this congressional session (December), or even by the end of President Obama’s second term in 2016. Partisanship in Congress seems to have put most education bills in limbo.  As a result, the Obama administration has taken action on education policy through a series of waivers easing parts of the No Child Left Behind Act.  This has given the U.S. Department of Education more say in what happens in schools, but these solutions are temporary and make for an uncertain future for educators. Of high importance is the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, last renewed in 2002.

View a complete list of education laws up for renewal.


Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act - governs vocational education programs and is the largest federal program for high schools
Last renewed in 2006
 
Child Care and Development Block Grant Act - Governs major child-care grants
Last renewed in 1996
 
Education Sciences Reform Act – Governsthe Institute of Educations Sciences
Last renewed in 2002
 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act - Governs Title I and other key K-12 education programs; most recent version is the No Child Left Behind Act
Last renewed in 2002
 
Head Start Act - Governs the program that offers early childhood education services to low-income families
Last renewed in 2007
 
Higher Education Act - Governs teacher education programs, as well as student financial aid and college access programs
Last renewed in 2008
 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act - Governs special education programs
Last renewed in 2004
 
Workforce Investment Act - Governs job training programs
Last renewed in 1998


Congress finally reaches budget deal
In December, the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate reached a bipartisan agreement to set spending levels for the current, FY14 fiscal year. Sen. Patty Murray, D-WA, and Rep. Paul Ryan, R-WI, led their respective houses through the negotiation. RRCNA was one of 64 national organizations that signed a letter to congressional leadership in support of maintaining the only birth-to-Grade 12 funding stream for literacy instruction in the education budget.

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Federal funding for most schools, previously reduced through the 5% across-the-board cuts imposed by sequestration last March, will be largely restored. Schools will feel the impact beginning this fall. Title I grants for districts and special education state grants will be slightly increased, though neither program will be restored to pre-sequestration levels. This may provide some relief to recent class size increases, limits on professional development, and other cutbacks.

 
Previously funded at $164 million, the final deal provides $158 million for a comprehensive literacy program to advance literacy skills—pre-literacy skills, reading, and writing—for students from birth through Grade 12, including limited-English-proficient students and students with disabilities. At least 15% of the funds are for children from birth through age 5, 40% will be used to serve students in kindergarten through Grade 5, and 40% are for students in middle and high school. The remaining 5% supports state education agencies’ efforts to implement the program.


 

Advocates for Literacy calls for literacy funding in FY2014 budget
The Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy (SRCL) Program is the main federal program to improve literacy achievement essential for a thriving U.S. economy.  The Reading Recovery Council, a member of Advocates for Literacy, signed on to a letter to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget calling for level funding of SRCL ($159 million) in the FY2014 budget. Advocates for Literacy is a coalition of more than 70 national organizations dedicated to the development of comprehensive literacy strategies at the state and federal levels.

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The letter cited that in order for the United States to compete in a global knowledge-based economy, young people must graduate with the advanced reading and writing skills required for career and college success. Two-thirds of all new jobs will require some type of postsecondary training.  Currently, the manufacturing sector reports over 600,000 jobs in the U.S. go unfilled because applicants do not possess necessary literacy skills.  Other sectors report that they would relocate new jobs in the United States if the U.S. had the requisite highly skilled workforce.  

The Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Program takes a comprehensive approach. It supports literacy development and instruction from birth through Grade 12—from beginning letter recognition to the ability to infer and comprehend complex text—to ensure that all students can read and write at grade level.

SRCL provides resources to states and local schools to build educators’ knowledge and skills in providing literacy instruction and support for each grade level and in each content area.  The six states that have current Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy grants are building integrated systems of effective literacy instruction that include both core and advanced literacy skills which all students will need to succeed in college and the workplace.


Reading Recovery plays vital role in meeting Common Core Standards
As the vast majority of states move forward with adopting Common Core State Standards, RRCNA has published a description of how Reading Recovery plays a vital role to ensure that first graders who struggle with literacy learning can meet grade-level standards and benefit from instruction at every subsequent grade level.

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Many states are moving forward with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. These Standards define knowledge and skills students need during their K-12 school years in order to be college and career ready at the end of high school. Although the Standards do not define specific methods or programs, an effective early intervention is critical for students already struggling with literacy learning.

Free resources answer questions for teachers and administrators

Reading Recovery is a research- and evidence-based first-grade reading intervention that brings the majority of students with a complete intervention to grade-level performance within 12 to 20 weeks of daily 30-minute lessons. By helping struggling readers quickly catch up with their peers in Grade 1, Reading Recovery plays a vital role in ensuring that students can benefit from instruction at every subsequent grade level.

Read the Common Core State Standards and find out which states have adopted the standards.




Literacy grants to be awarded in six states thanks to Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Program
Plans are underway in Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Texas to award federal literacy funds to local education agencies (LEAs). These states were the winners of a $180 million competition designed to advance literacy skills for children from birth through Grade 12. The federal definition of eligible services includes “targeted interventions for students reading below grade level.” If you are in one of the six states, contact your state department of education about opportunities to secure funds to support Reading Recovery.

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Background
For the past 3 years, the Reading Recovery Council of North America has been part of a coalition of 40 national education organizations that advocated for increased resources to support literacy for children from birth through Grade 12. The coalition has been instrumental in the development of the Literacy Education for All, Results for the Nation (LEARN) Act and the Striving Readers Comprehensive Literacy Program (SRCL).

Funding for the Striving Readers Program was first appropriated in FY 2010 and provided $200 million for a comprehensive literacy development and education program. In 2012, $159 million was appropriated to continue these efforts. In October 2010, formula grants were awarded to State Education Agencies to create State Literacy Teams that would develop a comprehensive plan. The remainder of the FY 10 funds, $180 million, was open to a competition for all states. Georgia, Louisiana, Montana, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Texas were winners of the competition. These states will use 95% of their award to make subgrants to LEAs. Contact your state education agency to learn more about timelines and possibilities.


900 organizations join to urge highest budget allocations
RRCNA has joined a coalition of 900 organizations urging congressional leadership to provdie the largest possible budget allocations to the Labor, Health, and Human Services, Education and related agenciess for FY2013. The coalition believes that rebuilding the U.S. investment in these domestic programs will boost the economy and reduce the deficit through prevention of costly chronic diseases, increased earnings, and reduced expenditures for unemployment and other social service programs.