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We ensure that children who struggle in learning to read and write gain the skills for a literate and productive future.

For RRCNA Leadership

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Donors Celebrate Special PeopleShelby and Sidney Yastrow

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Yastrows honor family and friends with the gift of reading

As former regional superintendent of schools in Lake County, IL, Sybil Yastrow saw firsthand the power of Reading Recovery to create strong teachers and to change the future for struggling young readers. She also understood the importance of a strong professional association and served on the RRCNA Board of Directors and as chair of the Development Committee. Now retired, her support for Reading Recovery continues. Sybil and her husband Shelby donated $25,000 designated to support the Reading Recovery marketing initiative.  And each December, she and Shelby contribute to the Reading Recovery Fund in honor of friends and family members.  We appreciate the Yastrows’ ongoing support as they honor these individuals.


Tony Reese
Zanesville teachers honor Tony Reese

 Teacher Leader Allison Karling and a group of teachers from Zanesville City Schools, Zanesville, OH, contributed to the Reading Recovery fund in honor of site coordinator Tony Reese in recognition of his leading role in keeping Reading Recovery a priority at the Zanesville site for many years.   He has supported Reading Recovery teachers by providing the funding, supplies, and provisions for their continuing professional development.  



Phoebe Ingraham and Richard Bell

Phoebe Ingraham remembers her dad

I was fortunate to have the best Dad in the world. His name was Richard H. Bell, and more than anything, he believed in the power of education and literacy. He struggled with reading as a young boy, but grew to be an avid reader as an adult. I have fond memories of both my mother and him reading to my three sisters, my brother, and me. Although Dad wasn’t actually involved in Reading Recovery, his connections were many — from teaching in Wisconsin, to attending graduate school at Ohio State where he became friends with Martha King and Leland Jacobs, to helping organize The Writer’s Conference at Chautauqua, NY, an annual week-long workshop for budding children’s authors where he worked with such notable authors as Joy Cowley, Jerry and Eileen Spinelli, Patricia Lee Gauch, and Bernice Cullinan. This photo of my father and me was taken at Chautauqua in 2007.

 

Diane HolumColleagues pay tribute to Diane Holum

While attending the National Reading Recovery Conference in Columbus, OH, Tonya Person listened to introductions of various grant recipients during the opening keynote session. She began thinking about her fellow Reading Recovery teacher leader Diane Holum, who was unable to attend the conference because she was in the hospital fighting the effects of multiple myeloma. Then inspiration hit her; why not do something in honor of Diane’s contributions to early literacy, commitment to learning, passion for literacy, and advocacy for ongoing professional development in Minnesota. Sadly, soon after the conference, Diane Holum lost her battle with cancer.  Minnesota Literacy Professional Development Grants were created in her memory to honor the long-time Reading Recovery teacher leader, classroom teacher, mentor, and political activist. Diane was also a doting grandmother, an avid reader and researcher, and a gardener.

  

Rupert Bunny JohnsonTeacher leaders honor Clifford Johnson with memorial
recognizing his father

Clifford Johnson, trainer at Georgia State University, brought Reading Recovery to Georgia and taught the first Reading Recovery teacher leader training class in Georgia during the 1991–1992 academic year. Over the next 14 years Johnson and his Georgia State University colleagues, Sue Duncan and Floretta Thornton-Reid, supervised the training and teaching of 60 teacher leaders. These teacher leaders have trained hundreds of Reading Recovery teachers, and tens of thousands of struggling readers in Georgia, Tennessee, Florida, and Bermuda have benefited from their efforts.

With this legacy of learning, teacher leaders at Georgia State University honored Johnson with contributions in memory of his father, Rupert “Bunny” Johnson. The contributions to the Reading Recovery Fund given in Bunny Johnson’s memory will help RRCNA continue his legacy of advocacy, support of professional development, and strengthening Reading Recovery’s service to the most-vulnerable children. "Dad would be so pleased to know that my teacher leaders gave gifts in his name that will be used to help children who are having more than the usual difficulty learning to read and write," Johnson said.